Why 'Today is the day' to talk about climate change Premier

PAYING IT FORWARD: It started with an ash covered Rabbitohs cap and ended with $400,000 in donations to the RFS and Mike Cannon-Brookes' questions of the Prime Minister and Premier about climate change and bushfires. Here Russell Crowe gifts $105,000 to RFS Captain John Larnder.
PAYING IT FORWARD: It started with an ash covered Rabbitohs cap and ended with $400,000 in donations to the RFS and Mike Cannon-Brookes' questions of the Prime Minister and Premier about climate change and bushfires. Here Russell Crowe gifts $105,000 to RFS Captain John Larnder. Matt Deans

RURAL fireys have officially tipped their hat to Nana Glen's most famous resident Russell Crowe.

The fundraiser that saw the actor/director take to Twitter to auction off an ash and dirt covered South Sydney cap that he wore during the clean-up of his Nana Glen property has netted $400,000 for the NSW Rural Fire Service.

Software billionaires Mike Cannon-Brookes of Atlassian pledged $100,000 for the cap, which was backed up by the co-founder of his company Scott Farquhar and Ryan Smith co-founder and CEO of Qualtrics with Crowe himself to also match the donation. 

"Hey Russell you've started something amazing here, Cannon-Brookes tweeted to Crowe.

"Your hat has now generated $400k in donations  in 24h to help tired, exhausted fireys.

As part of his winning bid, the tech tycoon who's worth an estimated $9-billion asked Crowe to sign the cap with the words 'Today is the Day' and hand it off to a young child, who had been a victim of the bushfire emergency.
When asked what those words meant, Cannon-Brookes explained:

 

Premier Gladys Berejiklian and Prime Minister Scott Morrison front the media to talk about the bushfire response.
Premier Gladys Berejiklian and Prime Minister Scott Morrison front the media to talk about the bushfire response. Twitter

"Not today. Not today," NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said when Prime Minister Scott Morrison was asked about the effect of climate change on bushfires," he tweeted.

"10 days ago you said it 'wasn't the day' to talk about the clear links between climate change and bushfires.
'Is today the day #nametheday?'

He signed off saying the day was actually 'yesterday.'

Aside from the politicalization of the fundraiser, the $400,000 has been gratefully received by local rural fire service brigades, who used the  Crowe family farm at Nana Glen as an elevated  staging point to contain the fire from spreading through the township and towards the coast. 

Russell on Friday donated his $105,000 share of the funds to 16 Rural Fire Service units here on the Coffs Coast including the  Coffs, Nana Glen, Karangi, Woolgoolga, Orara, Solitary, Coramba, Bostabrick and Sandy Beach brigades.

"I want to thank the volunteers all over the state and all over the country that work tirelessly to keep our communities safe," he said.

NSW Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said the fireys were grateful for the huge donation.

"What he stated started out as a random silly idea is certainly far from it when it comes to the men and women of the Rural Fire Service," he said.

"And indeed it is reflective of the extraordinary generosity that we're seeing right across New South Wales and much further afield."