MORE THAN MY CHAIR: 17-year-old Lachlan Coghlan and his mother Tanya. Lachlan is hoping to prove to others it's not shameful to be in a wheelchair.
MORE THAN MY CHAIR: 17-year-old Lachlan Coghlan and his mother Tanya. Lachlan is hoping to prove to others it's not shameful to be in a wheelchair. Nicole Zurcas

Warwick teenager proves there's no shame in disability

FOUR years ago getting up to dance wouldn't have crossed Lachlan Coghlan's mind.

After a brain tumour the size of a tennis ball ruptured it left Lachlan with severe impairments, making joining a dance troupe an extraordinary accomplishment for the teenager.

Today Lachlan performed with 20 of his classmates from the Warwick State High School Special Education Unit at the Disability Action Week Expo at WIRAC.

With limited dance experience Lachlan got up and showed off his moves.

"It was a little bit embarrassing but I also had heaps of fun," Lachlan said.

"It means a lot to be given the opportunity to be like the mainstream kids."

The students twirled to the likes of Ed Sheeran and performed the classic, Time Warp.

Rehearsing for eight weeks, special education teacher, Deb Follett said the students had learnt wonders.

"For a lot of these students partner dancing is a huge accomplishment," Mrs Follett said.

Not only was the expo a good opportunity to catch up with past students, Mrs Follett said it would help them with their future goals.

"Today is so important for the children to build pathways for when they leave school," she said.

"To know what services are out there to help them achieve their goals."

For Lachlan it's about learning there's more to life than his wheelchair.

"I've learnt it's not shameful to get up and have a go when you have a disability," he said.

"I'm very determined to walk and to have a career working with animals."

Disability Action Week will be celebrated across the Southern Downs until September 22.

To see the full calendar of events visit the council website.