Twenty tonnes of lamb that was destined for supermarkets is being sent to landfill after this morning's semi-trailer crash on the Pacific Highway.
Twenty tonnes of lamb that was destined for supermarkets is being sent to landfill after this morning's semi-trailer crash on the Pacific Highway. Frank Redward

Truckload of lamb goes to landfill

OPINION: IT IS easy to understand why 20-tonnes of lamb that's been left sitting for some five hours unrefrigerated on the roadside is deemed to be unfit for human consumption.

But it's hard to fathom that such a large quantity of meat is now being dumped in landfill, without a consideration for a better use.

After this morning's semi-trailer rollover on the Pacific Highway at the England's Rd roundabout crews have worked hard offloading the crates of lamb cuts by hand from the overturned semi-trailer.

Once loaded onto machinery, it's now sadly being disposed of into the back of trucks to be dropped off in landfill at the nearby Englands Rd waste facility.

As we all know, the average retail price of lamb has risen dramatically in Australia.

It is now said to be around an average of $16 a kilogram across all cuts, and we all know what we have to pay for prime cuts.

Considering there's 20-tonnes of lamb cuts that's being unloaded from the semi-trailer it's astounding to think how many freezers that could have been filled.

According to crews working on scene, the directive has come down from the insurance company that is working with the supermarket involved and the transport company, which was freighting the cargo at the time of the crash.

Sure it's easy to understand that perhaps there's concern over the meat going bad and the ramifications if it is consumed by humans, so what about the local RSPCA animal shelter, local vets or even a 'free for all' for dog owners?

Gone are the days of commonsense.

Matters like these that once took care of themselves in the past, now have to be assessed with a careful view of the ramifications involved and the legal consequences.

Considering all angles it brings back memories of the Murbah Swamp Beer saga where a truck carrying over 40,000 bottles of beer ran off the road and crashed into the river along the Tweed Valley Way.

As the famous documentary on the incident from 2002 tells the local community sure helped out in the clean-up and the problem was quickly solved.