Dr Ben Richard, RN Christine Nugent and Dr Juan Vazques with clinical nurse consultant for trauma for the local health district Maryanne Sewell running through a scenario where a patient received multiple injuries from a car accident.
Dr Ben Richard, RN Christine Nugent and Dr Juan Vazques with clinical nurse consultant for trauma for the local health district Maryanne Sewell running through a scenario where a patient received multiple injuries from a car accident. Marc Stapelberg

The reality of a hospital emergency room

Trauma training in Lismore : Dr Ben Richard, RN Christine Nugent and Dr Juan Vazques with clinical nurse consultant for trauma for the local health district Maryanne Sewell running through a scenario where a patient received multiple injuries from a car accident.
Trauma training in Lismore : Dr Ben Richard, RN Christine Nugent and Dr Juan Vazques with clinical nurse consultant for trauma for the local health district Maryanne Sewell running through a scenario where a patient received multiple injuries from a car accident.

THE life of medical and nursing staff means one minute you could be tending to a sick person in bed, the next you could be working quickly to save someone hit by a car.

The variations in situations means adequate training is a must for the outcomes of patients.

On Monday an Emergency Medicine Education and Training workshop was held for medical and nursing staff who work in the region's peripheral hospitals, and focused on "summertime emergencies".

EMET is a program funded by the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and run by the Richmond Health Network, through Lismore Base Hospital's specialist emergency consultant Dr Martin Chase.

The afternoon session included four high fidelity resuscitation simulations on near drowning, heat sickness, multi-trauma and unimmunised baby with sepsis, with the emphasis on team work, resources and life-saving procedures.

 

Dr Ben Richard, RN Christine Nugent and Dr Juan Vazques with clinical nurse consultant for trauma for the local health district Maryanne Sewell running through a scenario where a patient received multiple injuries from a car accident.
Dr Ben Richard, RN Christine Nugent and Dr Juan Vazques with clinical nurse consultant for trauma for the local health district Maryanne Sewell running through a scenario where a patient received multiple injuries from a car accident. Marc Stapelberg

EMET program support officer Helen Briggs said the training aimed to improve the outcomes for patients and build on teamwork in emergency situations.

"You might not get someone with a multi-trauma often so you don't get to practice your skills that often so if we do it through simulation it's a bit of stress inoculation as well so that when something a bit confronting comes in you're able to find the protocols to support what you do," Ms Briggs said.

"The feedback is really amazing. It's good for retention of doctors because they feel like they're supported, they don't feel like they're left out in the smaller sites without support and education.

"We've had extraordinary circumstances where we might have taught something in a hospital, like a life-saving procedure, one day and then that actual thing comes in the very next day."

The manager of clinical simulation, Sharene Pascoe, said The University Centre for Rural Health offered simulation training for post-graduate health professionals.

"We try and make it as inter-professional as possible so that we are working together and we concentrate on the team work aspect of things so communication is improved during crisis situations," Ms Pascoe said.

"We can't measure how many patients it has improved the care of but certainly ... studies do show that if you can communicate and work better in teams you're more likely to have a better outcome with the patient in terms of safety and quality."