The industry that is in the grip of a 'harrowing shortfall'

THIS profession is the "lifeblood of the state's infrastructure" and a key agent in critical development projects.

But there is already a critical shortfall of registered surveyors in New South Wales, and the situation is only going to get worse - it is estimated there will be a shortage of 7000 surveyors and associated workers by the middle of the next decade.

Surveyors are a necessary component of the development and building process.

Despite their importance, NSW Surveyor General Narelle Underwood said the state was "already in the grip of a harrowing shortfall of qualified surveyors".

She said the problem stemmed from a lack of general understanding about the role of a surveyor, combined with a lack of students studying mathematics and extension maths in Years 11 and 12.

Ms Underwood said the solution was to engage children with mathematics in their early education.

 

NSW is in the grip of a shortfall of qualified surveyors.
Young people need to be engaged in the industry from early in their education. Contributed

"It's important that children from primary school level develop a love for maths they can carry over into high school where having passionate maths teachers can engage them by translating those seemingly complex formulas into real life applications," she said.

"Mathematics can be incredibly user-friendly and its growing appeal can be seen in the success of the iSTEM program in our schools which, in the five years since its initial unveiling to a small number of schools and students, has grown phenomenally in popularity.

"No-one can predict what the future holds but surely training and engaging kids today in the fields and roles of tomorrow should be a priority."

 

NSW is in the grip of a shortfall of qualified surveyors.
"Training and engaging kids today in the fields and roles of tomorrow should be a priority.” Contributed

Consulting Surveyors National president Gerry Shone said surveyors were the silent workhorses of the Australian economy and the effects of shortages in the profession would be felt throughout the broader community.

"They will slow the housing industry, make vital electricity and transport infrastructure improvements slower and reduce the nation's ability to adapt nimbly to a post-boom mining era," he said.