SEX OFFENCES: Kilkivan businessman Wilfred Kenneth Monckton (left), with unknown acquaintances outside Gympie's Channon St courthouse precinct on Monday.
SEX OFFENCES: Kilkivan businessman Wilfred Kenneth Monckton (left), with unknown acquaintances outside Gympie's Channon St courthouse precinct on Monday. Arthur Gorrie

STIFF SENTENCE: Bad granddad, 77, admits 'drunken stupidity'

KILKIVAN businessman Wilfred Kenneth Monckton was noted for his good character until he was convicted of sex offences in Gympie District Court this week.

And he is still highly regarded, according to references presented to the court.

Wilfred Kenneth Monckton, now 77, pleaded guilty to sexual assaults committed at the Kilkivan Hotel on December 15, 2016, when he was 75.

Judge Glen Cash said Monckton had "no serious criminal history of relevance" and accepted that the offences, involving intimate and unwanted touching, were acts of "drunken, opportunistic stupidity."

Judge Cash said personal deterrence was not necessary, but general deterrence and the generally serious nature of the offences were relevant.

The father, grandfather and great grandfather touched a young woman, 19, in the crotch area while drinking at the Kilkivan Hotel, the judge noted in his sentencing comments.

Monckton took his hand away when a hotel staff member walked by, but then took the woman's hand and placed it on his crotch. She could feel his penis, the court was told.

She had accepted a lift home with him and as they drove home he touched her again.

She pushed his hand away, the court was told. She agreed to hug him goodnight.

"As you hugged her, you pulled her close and put your hand down her underpants," the judge said.

The woman called a friend, spoke to police the next day and made a phone call to Monckton, which was recorded by police without Monckton's knowledge.

Judge Cash said Monckton had apologised and later said he was drunk. He noted references from prominent Kilkivan people, who described him as generous, of good character, sincere and genuine.

He had made contributions to the community he moved to eight years ago, the judge said.

He provided employment to people who needed work and supported sports teams and charitable events.

Describing Monckton's conduct as "a silly carry-on," the judge said Monckton continued to be a productive member of society. "The fact so many are prepared to speak highly of you is to your credit," he said.

He sentenced Monckton to nine months jail, suspended for two years, warning Monckton any offence punishable by jail would see him back in court, including drink driving or public nuisance offences.

If that happened, the judge said, "You can expect to have a hard time talking a judge out of sentencing you to jail on that occasion."