BOCSAR researchers found NSW drivers are far less likely to pay large fines than small ones.
BOCSAR researchers found NSW drivers are far less likely to pay large fines than small ones. FILE

Speeding drivers refuse to pay big fines

THE more expensive a speeding fine, the less inclined we are to pay up - and it is costing New South Wales hundreds of millions of dollars.

New Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research figures reveal being stopped by police is no more effective in getting people to pay a fine than being nabbed by a speed camera.

The size of the fine - not the method of delivery - was the biggest contributing factor.

Researchers surveyed 3158 people, 2222 of whom had been fined for a parking or traffic offence.

Respondents were asked if they had always paid fines on time and whether they had considered not paying one at all.

"Respondents were then asked to imagine that they are driving along a major road trying to get to an appointment but were booked for speeding and received a fine," BOCSAR explained in a statement.

More than 80% of those receiving a hypothetical $254 fine said they would almost certainly pay it on time, while only 69% of those facing a $436 infringement notice would do so.

Only 31% of those facing a hypothetical $2252 fine said they would pay it.

Unemployed respondents were less likely to pay the $2252 fine than those in paid work (63% compared to 53%).

Younger males who had been fined recently, had a history of getting speeding fines or knew someone who had refused to pay a fine and gotten away with it were the most likely to shirk their fine-paying responsibilities.

The NSW Office of State Revenue in February revealed $1.2 billion in unpaid fines and taxes was owed.

More than $200 million, mostly fines, had already been written off as unable to be recovered.

ARM NEWSDESK