The Daily Telegraph journalist Campbell Gellie, decked out in Nike, was allowed in. Picture: Justin Lloyd.
The Daily Telegraph journalist Campbell Gellie, decked out in Nike, was allowed in. Picture: Justin Lloyd.

Pub lifts Nike shoe ban after patron outrage

PATRONS have put the boot into a brand newpub which has been forced to reverse its ban on customers wearing Nike footwear in the bar.

The Marsden Brewhouse was forced to backdown on its prohibition of sneaker wearing patrons, which was implemented by a staff member.

The Nike ban sat alongside "gang tattoos'' as being a "no-no'' for the newly-opened pub at Marsden Park.

Bizarrely, the staffer who posted the ban also said bumbags were off the menu for men - but didn't say they were banned for women.

The sign which was outside the Marsden Brewhouse outlined what the regulations were. Picture: Facebook
The sign which was outside the Marsden Brewhouse outlined what the regulations were. Picture: Facebook

 

But it was the ban on two popular styles of Nike footwear - TN's and Air Maxes - that really seems to have put patrons on the wrong foot.

After 6pm, "tradie wear" such a high-vis clothing and work boots, as well as thongs or slides, were also banned.

The rules have been heavily criticised with one person saying it was "discrimination".

"What a joke! They have no idea. Talk about discrimination!"

Another said the banned sneakers are actually expensive footwear coveted by children.

"Just make sure no children or family members are wearing their brand new Nike Air Max or Nike TN sneakers that cost every parent a fortune as you will be refused entry apparently and labelled a thug/criminal".

The Marsden Brewhouse in Marsden Park.
The Marsden Brewhouse in Marsden Park.


The pub is run by the millionaire Laundy family who have hotels across Sydney.

Family patriarch Arthur Laundy said the dress code was dumped as soon as it came to his attention on Monday.

He said the rules may have been posted on the pub's doors because of unwelcomed "eshays" - a derogatory slang word for Australian lads - that had been hanging around the pub.

Patriarch Arthur Laundy, pictured with retired politician son Craig Laundy, lifted the ban after it was brought to his attention. Picture: Tim Hunter
Patriarch Arthur Laundy, pictured with retired politician son Craig Laundy, lifted the ban after it was brought to his attention. Picture: Tim Hunter

"When I found out about it this morning, it was pulled down immediately,'' Mr Laundy told 2GB.

"I have no idea who put it up there, evidently I've since found out. There are some of the guys, the guys who wear their caps back to front, "eshays" have been around the front of the hotel, just being intimidating.

"Security have moved them on, whether it has anything to do with that I've no idea.''

Mr Laundy said the pub was a "family hotel", adding: "As far as dress codes go, as long as they're reasonably dressed, I have no problems with dress codes. I own a lot of hotels, I don't have dress codes in a lot of those."

He said patrons should just be wearing pants and a shirt.

Jake Wilson, Aaron Wheeler and Thomas Emery said they didn’t mind dress codes, as long as they didn’t discriminate. Picture: Justin Lloyd
Jake Wilson, Aaron Wheeler and Thomas Emery said they didn’t mind dress codes, as long as they didn’t discriminate. Picture: Justin Lloyd

 

 

The Daily Telegraph's Campbell Gellie tested the dress code on Monday complete with manbag and Nike clothing and was allowed in.

At nearby hotel The Winston, storeman Jake Wilson, 29, said he didn't mind dress codes if they don't discriminate.

"Idiots can come in all shapes and sizes," he said.

"If it's because they had a bunch of rowdy guys come in then they are punishing the majority because of the minority."