NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS)  are appealing for information about an illegal party which left a 'disgraceful aftermath' last Sunday, June 16.
NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) are appealing for information about an illegal party which left a 'disgraceful aftermath' last Sunday, June 16. contributed

Illegal doofers leave 'disgracfeul aftermath' at park

AN important site within Arakwal National Park has been trashed after an illegal party last weekend.

Equipment, rubbish, clothing and human waste products were strewn throughout an area of both indigenous cultural importance and conservation significance next to Tallow Creek.

NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) staff were left to clean up the "disgraceful aftermath of an illegal dance party" on the Sunday morning of June 16.

A NPWS spokesman said the native vegetation was trampled, and tree branches had been cut for an illegal fire and to make space for the party.

"The area is used as a refuge by threatened shorebirds, and as habitat and a food source for other native wildlife," the spokesman said.

"National Parks are established for the protection of these special places and the species they support.

"Unauthorised large-scale events are prohibited due to the damage and disturbance they cause to the environment, as well as safety concerns for the participants and surrounding community.

"It can take years for a site to recover and sometimes irreversible damage is caused, especially when threatened species are involved."

The spokesman said there had been several illegal dance parties at Tallow Beach within the last few months.

NPWS has fined some of the organisers of past events and is now calling for help from the community to prevent further damage occurring.

People can assist by reporting information about the parties to National Parks, or by calling the Police. Please contact Crimestoppers 1800 333 000 or the Byron NPWS Office 6639 8300.

Holding illegal events in National Parks can lead to the prosecution of individuals for up to $3300 per offence.