TRAGIC: Belinda Robinson's dog, Angel, was mauled to paraplegia before she died in 2017. Belinda now holds her dogs close and urges pet owners to be more responsible.
TRAGIC: Belinda Robinson's dog, Angel, was mauled to paraplegia before she died in 2017. Belinda now holds her dogs close and urges pet owners to be more responsible. Belinda Robinson

'Devastated' owner pleads for tighter leash on menacing dogs

A TRAUMATIC dog attack has left a Sunshine Coast woman in fear after the preventable incident put her "best friend" in an urn.

Belinda Robinson still remembers the screams of her chihuahua, Angel, two years on from the day she was mauled by two dogs.

She said owners of dangerous dogs should need a licence.

The passionate animal advocate joined recent victims pleading for dog owners to keep menacing dogs on leashes or in muzzles in public to avoid situations where "nobody wins".

"The result can be devastating and the impacts last a lifetime, not only for the victim but for the aggressor too," she said.

"You have to do a safety course to get a gun licence, but dogs can also kill and you don't need to meet any safety measure to have one."

The 27 year old's memories of her late-dog's trauma were relived last month when an unrestrained dog "teeth bared and saliva dripping" ran towards her two dogs.

 

Angel became a paraplegic before she died in 2017.
Angel became a paraplegic before she died in 2017. Contributed

Despite $20,000 worth of vet bills, hydro-therapy and medication, Ms Robinson said a paraplegic Angel died and both attacking dogs were destroyed by the council.

Acting quickly, she scooped up her new pets and ran in the hope of avoiding a similar fate.

 

Belinda Robinson with one of her dogs.
Belinda Robinson with one of her dogs. Contributed

"I will literally stand in between and let the dog maul me over my dogs," she said.

"I am starting to think it's not even worth walking them any more."

 

Belinda's boyfriend, Luke Graham with dogs Stella and Layla.
Belinda's boyfriend, Luke Graham with dogs Stella and Layla. Contributed

Ms Robinson's experience mirrors a similar incident brought to light through court proceedings this week where a small dog died after an attack by two large dogs on April 8.

According to Sunshine Coast Council, both dogs were returned to their owner under "strict conditions".

Despite the concerns, a council spokesperson said menacing dog attacks had declined 20 per cent in the past three years- sitting at 413 attacks since July last year.

Less than one per cent of more than 40,000 registered dogs on the Sunshine Coast were classified as menacing or dangerous.

"Council actively investigates reports of aggressive dogs. If the allegations are proven, council may declare the dog to be a regulated dog," they said.

Ms Robinson urged pet owners to be more responsible and consider leashing or muzzling aggressive dogs when around people and other pets.