Chiropractor Warren Jon Young  can be identified for the first time after he pleaded not guilty to sending and receiving child exploitation material.
Chiropractor Warren Jon Young can be identified for the first time after he pleaded not guilty to sending and receiving child exploitation material.

Chiro faces child exploitation material charges

A Mount Barker chiropractor has pleaded not guilty to charges of sending and receiving child exploitation material.

Warren Jon Young, 42, appeared in the Adelaide Magistrates Court today where he entered pleas to four charges.

Under South Australian legislation he can now be identified for the first time.

The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency lists Young's status as suspended, however it is unclear whether that is because his registration has expired or because of the pending trial.

Chiropractor Warren Young who pleaded not guilty to charges of accessing and transmitting child exploitation material. He will now face a trial in the District Court. Picture: Mitch Mott
Chiropractor Warren Young who pleaded not guilty to charges of accessing and transmitting child exploitation material. He will now face a trial in the District Court. Picture: Mitch Mott

Court files accessed by The Advertiser show that Young is accused of using the internet messaging application Kik to access images and videos of child exploitation material.

Young allegedly communicated with other accounts under the name "swimma16" and both received and sent the pictures and videos.

The alleged offending was referred to Australian Federal Police by the United States based National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children.

The South Australian branch of the Joint Anti Child Exploitation Taskforce investigated the referral.

Following the arrest Young was restricted in how he could use his mobile phone.

During his first court appearance in August last year, Young asked the court to vary his bail so he could travel to Fiji with his family.

He also asked to have his mobile phone restrictions relaxed so he could use the device for banking, education and work purposes, as well as emails.

Magistrate Mark Semmens described the man's application to travel to Fiji as "a knife edge situation" but allowed the application "on balance"

He imposed a condition the man not have access to his mobile phone while overseas.

He said it was "unusual" the man's bail conditions allowed access to his mobile phone given the charges he was facing.