‘Bomb-maker’ had Christchurch shooter’s manifesto on phone

A SUBURBAN grandfather allegedly caught with bombs in Davoren Park has been granted bail despite police claiming he was involved in the manufacture of explosives, poisons and homemade firearms as well as drug dealing, espionage, anti-Islamic ideology, and "patriotic" actions online.

On Thursday, the Elizabeth Magistrates Court heard an analysis of Aaron Ellis' phone also discovered he had downloaded the manifesto of Christchurch Brenton Tarrant as well as video footage of the horrific massacre.

Accused bomb maker, Aaron Ellis of Davoren Park.
Accused bomb maker, Aaron Ellis of Davoren Park.

 

A bomb squad officer at the Davoren Park home, as police prepared to detonate the explosives known as ‘Mother of Satan’. Picture: AAP / Kelly Barnes
A bomb squad officer at the Davoren Park home, as police prepared to detonate the explosives known as ‘Mother of Satan’. Picture: AAP / Kelly Barnes

On Thursday, the Elizabeth Magistrates Court released Aaron Ellis on $1000 home detention bail to face court again in September.

Magistrate Gary Gumpl noted Ellis had been involved in "peculiar and bizarre" activities, but said there was no evidence whatsoever to suggest he intended to cause harm to anyone.

Ellis' release has been postponed, however, pending a potential challenge by SA Police in the Supreme Court.

Ellis, 43, of Davoren Park, has yet to plead to charges of possessing and manufacturing explosives.

Court evidence photos of explosive material allegedly taken from Aaron Ellis' Davoren Park home. Picture: Courts SA
Court evidence photos of explosive material allegedly taken from Aaron Ellis' Davoren Park home. Picture: Courts SA

The allegations arise from a raid on his Heytesbury Rd home last week, where police allegedly found a highly volatile substance known as "Mother of Satan".

It has the chemical name of TATP triacetone triperoxide and was allegedly found in a container in the freezer inside Ellis' shed.

The alleged discovery prompted the controlled detonation of the substance - in four, 10-minute intervals - that afternoon.

At the time, police said the incident was "not terrorism-related" despite Ellis posting, on social media, that he "hated Muslims".

His family, meanwhile, insisted he was a "loving man" with a "passion for chemistry" and making smoke bombs who was allowed to have his "own beliefs in cultures".

Last week, SA Police opposed Ellis' release on bail, saying he might pose a significant risk to public safety even if his actions were unrelated to terrorism.

They asked for more time to analyse his computer data, warning any form of release would be "premature" and "presumptuous".

One of the four controlled detonations at the Davoren Park home after the explosives were found. Picture: Nine News
One of the four controlled detonations at the Davoren Park home after the explosives were found. Picture: Nine News