Alex Ross-King was an “alcohol girl”, a friend said.
Alex Ross-King was an “alcohol girl”, a friend said.

‘Alex was not a drug taker. She just wanted to try it’

ONE of Central Coast teenager Alex Ross-King's closest friends says she was not a drug taker and was an "alcohol girl" before her sudden death after a dance rave.

It is understood Ms Ross-King purchased drugs in Terrigal before going to the FOMO festival in Parramatta on a "party bus" she and her friends had hired.

 

It is believed the 19-year-old took at least two MDMA capsules or pills before entering the festival where she died on Saturday night.

A close friend of Ms Ross-King, who did not wish to be identified, said she was not into drugs.

"I was really close with her and she never took drugs," the friend said.

"I just knew she never took drugs, she was always an alcohol girl, she'd have it all under control and was happy to just drink."

Alex Ross-King took a party bus to the FOMO music festival.
Alex Ross-King took a party bus to the FOMO music festival.

The friend said it could have been the nature of the FOMO festival that caused her to change her normal practice. "I think maybe the festival, maybe she just wanted to try it," she said.

The friend said the fact Ms Ross-King was not a big drug user only made the situation sadder.

"She's gone off and done something so small and it's taken her life," she said.

Another friend said Ms Ross-King was not a big drug user but sometimes indulged when "partying".

Alex Ross-King took at least two MDMA capsules or pills before entering the festival. Picture: David Swift.
Alex Ross-King took at least two MDMA capsules or pills before entering the festival. Picture: David Swift.

"(It was) young people partying, it's not addiction, it's just being young and having fun."

Ms Ross-King had been living in Lisarow and working at a butcher shop run by her family. She had recently finished high school and was planning to travel after she had saved money.

The friend, who went to school with Ms Ross-King, said drug use was common with those aged in their late teens to early 20s on the Central Coast.

"MDMA - a lot of caps and pills," she said. "A bit of cocaine."

She said her friend was not addicted.