Architectural drawings of a proposed medium density development at Epiq Lennox.
Architectural drawings of a proposed medium density development at Epiq Lennox.

25 'beach shacks' to be built in $9M development

A LENNOX Head residential estate could soon have an extra 25 "beach shack" style homes, if a $9 million development application gets the green light.

The plans for Epiq Lennox have been lodged with Ballina Shire Council by Newton Denny Chapelle on behalf of Clarence Property Corporation.

It would create 20 three-bedroom homes and five four-bedroom homes.

The report to the council explains that the development would "provide a different form of housing than is currently available within the Epiq Estate and respond to the emerging streetscape".

 

Architectural drawings of a proposed medium density development at Epiq Lennox.
Architectural drawings of a proposed medium density development at Epiq Lennox.

 

"(It would also) improve diversity and access into the housing market through an architecturally designed integrated built form," the report states.

"All dwellings are separated through either a fire rated wall or are detached building forms.

"Each building design incorporates generous and high-quality external living areas in the form of ground floor alfresco and courtyard areas.

"Efficient floor plans and a compact footprint maximises green space and focuses living areas onto private outdoor courtyards or decks.

 

Architectural drawings of a proposed medium density development at Epiq Lennox.
Architectural drawings of a proposed medium density development at Epiq Lennox.

 

"The forms and external materials palette reference coastal beach house archetypes and embodies passive environmental design principles."

In his design plans, architect Andrew Halstead said the development "sets out to provide the opportunity to live in a full-sized home but on a smaller, more easily maintained lot with a view to fostering a sense of local community and pride".

"This is encouraged by providing a built environment that provides a balance between private and public space as well as individuality and variety of colour, form and texture within a recognisably coastal architecture," he wrote.

"The approach seeks to build on this by providing visual cues to the 1950s and 60s 'beach shack' within the architecture but in a fully meaningful and functional way.

"The intent is to immediately associate 'beach' with 'home'."